Meets every Tuesday morning at 10 am in the Grace Lutheran Library during the regular school year and features group study and discussion of select Christian lecturers and/or authors.

 
 

Please come and join us for a study of THE NEW TESTAMENT. The course consists of a weekly half hour lecture by  Bart Ehrman , Prof. of Religious Studies  at the U of NC , Chapel Hill.  A half hour class discussion follows each lecture.  Study Group meets each Tuesday from 10-11 in the Grace Library.

In these lectures Professor Bart D. Ehrman develops a carefully reasoned understanding of the New Testament—and the individuals and communities who created its texts. "Our ultimate goal is to come to a fuller appreciation and understanding of these books that have made such an enormous impact on the history of Western civilization and that continue to play such an important role for people today," says Dr. Ehrman.

This course draws on modern biblical scholarship, recent archaeological discoveries, and careful literary analysis to trace the history of the New Testament and of the early Christian faith community.

"The books of the New Testament," says Professor Ehrman, are "best understood when situated in their own historical context—rather than taken out of context." The course will address such significant questions as:

  • Who wrote these books, under what circumstances, and for what audience?
  • What do the books of the New Testament say, what do they mean, and how historically accurate are they?
  • How can we can come to more fully appreciate and understand them?

Professor Ehrman brings impressive scholarly evidence to bear on the task of reconstructing the life and ministry of Jesus and the origins of Christianity in the decades before and during the composition of the books that make up the New Testament.

Dr. Ehrman clearly orients you in the world of Greco-Roman pagan cults and the world of early Judaism. The study of the New Testament in this course is broad and often surprising. Consider these themes from the course:

  • The earliest records of Jesus are probably right in portraying him as an apocalyptic prophet who anticipated God would soon intervene in the course of history to overthrow the forces of evil and establish his good kingdom on Earth, and that people needed to repent in preparation for it.
  • The Gospels are our principal sources for knowing about the life and teachings of Jesus, but they are also major literary works in their own right, each with its own perspective on who Jesus was and why his life and death matter.
  • Jesus is portrayed individually in all the Gospels, including two Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament, the Gospels of Peter and Thomas.
  • Many people believe that the relationship between Paul and Jesus enabled Paul, through his writings, to transform the religion of Jesus into a religion about Jesus.
  • Modern scholars examining some New Testament books that claim Paul as their author have concluded that they are, in fact, pseudonymous.
  • Portions of the New Testament were included hundreds of years after the death of Christ.

Contact Eva Mader at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions.